Dalai Lama Audio Teachings on Tibetan Buddhism Podcast

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H.H. the Dalai Lama, the most prominent contemporary figure in Tibetan Buddhism, teaches regularly on a variety of topics ranging from entry level lectures to profound oral commentaries on seminal texts covering subjects such as Wisdom, Compassion, Ethics, Nature of the Mind, Buddhism and Science, and Meditation and Psychotherapy. His office does a great job making the teachings available through its official webcast. Now they are available in a podcast here as MP3 audio files encoded at 64Kbps mono. If you rather see video, check out the “Dalai Lama Video Teachings” podcasts (available in Standard Quality and High Quality).

Bodhisattva's Way of Life: 24-June-2006 (Day 1 of 7; Morning) - Dalai Lama Audio Teachings on Tibetan Buddhism Podcast

April 26th, 2009

Episode 1 of 409 episodes

Achieving the very best for ourselves and others. This is what the practice of Bodhichitta is for. His Holiness the Dalai Lama begins his explanation of Shantideva’s “Guide to the Bodhisattva’s Way of Life” by stressing the virtuous power of Bodhichitta, the mind seeking Buddhahood for the sake of all creatures. It is the Bodhisattva’s defining qualityand the entrance to the great path to enlightenment. Before turning to Shantideva’s text His Holiness dwells on the dependently arisen nature of our happiness and suffering, showing by way of Buddha’s basic teaching of the four noble truths how both of them are produced from causes under our control. By awakening from ignorance to wisdom we can abandon behavior that leads to more dissatisfaction and cultivate the path that leads to stable and abiding happiness. Having found that path we can then develop the compassionate and joyful determination to show it to our brother and sister sentient beings. But, urges His Holiness, a human birth is rare and brief. It must be put to the best use now, without delay or procrastination. His Holiness extols the “Guide to the Bodhisattva’s Way of Life” as an inspiring condensed presentation of the way to our highest state of evolution unequalled in India or Tibet. He explores the text as far as verse 14, commenting on the title, the salutation, the promise of composition, the purpose of composing and, in the body of the text, entering on Shantideva’s eloquent preliminary praises of the precious Bodhichitta.