Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day


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Build your vocabulary with Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day! Each day a Merriam-Webster editor offers insight into a fascinating new word -- explaining its meaning, current use, and little-known details about its origin.



July 30th, 2015

Episode 272 of 681 episodes

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 30, 2015 is: grandiloquence \gran-DIH-luh-kwunss\ noun : a lofty, extravagantly colorful, pompous, or bombastic style, manner, or quality especially in language Examples: The grandiloquence of the columnist's writing gave him a reputation as a blowhard, but his opinions were deep and carefully considered. "It seems that the only thing that flows more freely than money in Washington is the grandiloquence of the partisans in each party." Daily News-Record (Harrisonburg, Virginia), September 29, 2014 Did you know? Grandiloquence, which first appeared in English in the late 16th century, is one of several English words pertaining to speech that derive from the Latin loqui, meaning "to speak." Other offspring of loqui include eloquent ("marked by fluent expression"), loquacious ("full of excessive talk"), and soliloquy ("a long dramatic monologue"). Grandiloquence comes (probably via Middle French) from the Latin adjective grandiloquus, which combines loqui and the adjective grandis ("grand or great"). A word that is very similar in meaning to grandiloquence is magniloquenceand the similarity is not surprising. Magniloquence combines loqui with magnus, another Latin word meaning "great."